Southeast Louisiana Storm Spotters

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NHC 2 day Atlantic Overview

by NOAA-NHC


 

NHC 5 day Atlantic Overview
by NOAA-NHC


 

 


NHC East Pacific Overview

by NOAA-NHC


 


Atlantic/Gulf Storm Model plots

by SFWMD

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NHC Marine Discussion Map
by NOAA-NHC


 


Real Time Wind patterns
by: Cameron Beccario


 


Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale

Category Sustained Winds Types of Damage Due to Hurricane Winds
1 74-95 mph
64-82 kts
119-153 km/h
Very dangerous winds will produce some damage: 
Well-constructed frame homes could have damage to roof, shingles, vinyl siding and gutters. Large branches of trees will snap and shallowly rooted trees may be toppled. Extensive damage to power lines and poles likely will result in power outages that could last a few to several days.

 

2 96-110 mph
83-95 kts
154-177 km/h
Extremely dangerous winds will cause extensive damage: 
Well-constructed frame homes could sustain major roof and siding damage. Many shallowly rooted trees will be snapped or uprooted and block numerous roads. Near-total power loss is expected with outages that could last from several days to weeks.

 

3
(major)
111-129 mph
96-112 kts
178-208 km/h
Devastating damage will occur: 
Well-built framed homes may incur major damage or removal of roof decking and gable ends. Many trees will be snapped or uprooted, blocking numerous roads. Electricity and water will be unavailable for several days to weeks after the storm passes.

 

4
(major)
130-156 mph
113-136 kts
209-251 km/h
Catastrophic damage will occur: 
Well-built framed homes can sustain severe damage with loss of most of the roof structure and/or some exterior walls. Most trees will be snapped or uprooted and power poles downed. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.

 

5
(major)
157 mph or higher
137 kts or higher
252 km/h or higher
Catastrophic damage will occur: 
A high percentage of framed homes will be destroyed, with total roof failure and wall collapse. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last for weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.

 

Tropical Weather Data


Tropical Surface Analysis


 


NOAA Gulf  IR-Rainbow Satellite


 

NOAA Active Storm Floater Satellite
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Active Invest & Tropical Cyclone GEFS Model plots
Courtesy: Tropical tidbits

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Active Invest & Tropical Cyclone Model Guidance
Courtesy: Tropical tidbits

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Active Cyclone Intensity Guidance
Courtesy: Tropical tidbits

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Official NHC Forecast
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Information on Tropical Cyclones:

The Atlantic Hurricane Season is from June 1 - November 30:
A hurricane is a tropical cyclone, a warm core Low Pressure area, which generally forms in the tropics and is accompanied by thunderstorms and a counterclockwise circulation of winds.
Tropical cyclones are classified as follows:
Tropical Depression:
Organized system of clouds and thunderstorms with defined surface circulation and max sustained winds of 38 mph or less.
Tropical Storm:
Organized system of strong thunderstorms with a defined surface circulation and maximum sustained winds of 39-73 mph.
Hurricane:
Intense tropical weather system of strong thunderstorms with a well-defined surface circulation & max sustained winds of 74 mph or higher.

What should I do with a Watch or Warning?
When a Hurricane Watch is issued for your part of the coast this indicates the possibility that you could experience hurricane conditions within 36 hours. This watch should trigger your family's disaster plan, and proactive measures should be initiated especially those actions that require extra time such as securing a boat, leaving a barrier island, etc.
 When a Hurricane Warning is issued for your part of the coast this indicates that sustained winds of at least 74 mph are expected within 24 hours. Once this warning has been issued, your family should be in the process of completing proactive actions and deciding the safest location to be during the storm.

What are some Hurricane Hazards?
Storm Surge:
Water that is pushed toward the shore by the force of the winds swirling around the storm. This advancing surge combines with the normal tides to create the hurricane storm tide, which can increase the mean water level 15 feet or more.
Inland Flooding:
In the last 30 years, inland flooding has been responsible for more than half the deaths associated with tropical cyclones in the US.
High Winds:
Hurricane force winds can destroy poorly constructed buildings and mobile homes. Debris such as signs, roofing material, and small items left outside become flying missiles in hurricanes.
Tornadoes:
Hurricanes can produce tornadoes that add to the storm's destructive power. Tornados are most likely to occur in the right-front quadrant of the hurricane.

 



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Gulf of Mexico IR Satellite

by: NOAA


 


Gulf of Mexico Visible Satellite

by: NOAA


 

 

Gulf of Mexico Water Vapor Imagery
by NOAA


 


Eastern US Water Vapor Satellite Loop
by: NOAA


 

 

Caribbean Water Vapor Satellite Loop
by: NOAA


 


Caribbean IR Rainbow Satellite Loop
by: NOAA


 


Gulf of Mexico IR Satellite Loop
by: NOAA


 


Interactive US Storm Surge Map
by: NOAA


 


Gulf of Mexico Wave Height Predictions
by: NOAA


 


Official NOAA Atlantic Basin
Printable Hurricane Tracking Chart


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